Dating antique sofa


23-Jan-2018 11:13

Antique furnishings can tell a story one that may only exist in the imagination of the lucky person acquiring the piece.

Some popular antiques are quite well documented and may be tied to a specific time period in history making an age determination quite simple. Adding to the complexity is the proliferation of copycat builders and modern furniture craftsmen who do an admirable job of cloning authentic antique furniture right down to the tool marks and date stamps.

Many of these books specialize in a specific era, such as Victorian furniture.

Some focus on a specific type of antique, such as antique chairs, while others provide a general overview of furniture from various periods or styles.

That said, it is important to realize that skilled craftsmen are building furniture by hand even today so you'll want to continue to investigate the age of the piece using at least one other method.

Furniture styles can be determined by careful study and remembering what design elements each one embraces.

Until then, following these steps will help you determine an approximate age of nearly any piece of antique furniture: These less obvious areas of the antique will provide clues as to whether the wooden components were cut using traditional methods like handsaws and planes, or whether the pieces were crafted using modern power tools.

If rough surfaces, plane scrapes, and tool marks are evident inside the piece of furniture, or on the back or bottom surfaces, you're probably looking at a pre-1860 model.

Tool marks and obvious signs of rough cuts are fairly typical with pieces more than 150 years old.

If you can feel slight, parallel ridges and hollows, the piece was hand planed, probably prior to the mid-19th Century.

Construction techniques can assist you in dating furniture. In the 17th Century, butt and rabbet joints were used.

This is a big topic to tackle and it will not be possible to cover many details in this short column. Oak joint stools, on the other hand, have been around for five hundred years.

Game or card tables did not exist in great numbers until the end of the 17th Century.However, learning a few basic tips and tricks used by experienced antique collectors and dealers will give even a novice collector the general knowledge needed to identify a piece of antique furniture.